Contact Us

KFLG MUSIC REVIEWS


Carrie UnderwoodCarrie Underwood Steals the Show at 2018 CMA Fest Night 2

Soundslikenashville.com – Annie Reuter

Carrie Underwood made her triumphant return to CMA Fest on June 8 for a powerful set that will be talked about in years to come. The singer’s performance captivated all in attendance at Nashville’s Nissan Stadium thanks to her jaw-dropping vocals and engaging live show.

A seasoned entertainer, Underwood took the audience of country music fans on a journey throughout her seven-song set. Donning an emerald green romper and silver booties, she shimmered from the cheap seats and her vocal power was undeniable on every song she sang. Underwood kicked off her memorable set with “Church Bells,” where it was immediately obvious fans were in for a very special night of music.

“We are so glad to be here this evening, and even more glad that you guys are here this evening,” Underwood said before launching into fan favorite “Last Name.” “So let’s keep this party going, shall we?”

Underwood’s set spanned her massive catalog of No. 1 hits and had fans on their feet and singing along word for word. On “Wasted” she’d head to the lower stage where she’d shake festivalgoers’ hands in the photo coral while on “Dirty Laundry” she showed her humor.

“We’re gonna have to change the words of this next song I think. It’s called ‘Dirty Laundry’ but we might need to sing ‘Sweaty Laundry.’ Mom joke,” she quipped.
While Underwood stole the evening, she wasn’t the only powerhouse vocalist on the lineup. Luke Combs impressed with his hit-heavy set and booming vocals. His performance alternated from the clever breakup songs with “Beer Never Broke My Heart” and “When It Rains It Pours” to the more sentimental ballads including “She Got the Best of Me” and “One Number Away.” While “Honky Tonk Highway” showcased his love for ’90s country, it was on his first No. 1 hit “Hurricane” that left a lasting mark.

“When I started writing songs seven years ago, I never imagined I would be up here. I feel like the luckiest guy in the world getting to stand on this stage at Nissan Stadium,” he said before closing his set.

Despite technical difficulties at the start of his set, Blake Shelton powered through his performance with songs that showcased his versatile catalog and appreciation for classic country music. He also shared with the audience that he was celebrating that evening after receiving two 2018 CMT Music Awards earlier in the week. His set included his previous No. 1 hits “I’ll Name the Dogs,” “Boys ‘Round Here” and “Austin,” as well as current single “I Lived It.”

“I want to play y’all a song that, man, I don’t know at the end of the day if this song is going to make it or not, but I wanted to put this thing out because it reminded me of what it was like growing up as a kid back in the ’80s,” he said of “I Lived It.”

While Shelton’s set was heavy on the sentimental songs, Old Dominion kicked the energy back up a notch with their feel-good tracks. Making the most of their timeslot on the main stage, Old Dominion powered through back-to-back hits with “Written In the Sand,” “No Such Thing As a Broken Heart,” “Break Up with Him” and “Snapback.”

Prefacing “No Such Thing As a Broken Heart,” frontman Matthew Ramsey said stadium shows were the reason they penned the song. “We could not be prouder to be standing here tonight with you,” frontman Matthew Ramsey said mid-set. “Let’s have a big sing-along. That’s why we wrote this song.”

The crowd more than obliged as the Ramsey held his microphone out to the audience of 60,000 fans who belted the song’s lyrics.

back to top


Thompson SquareAlbum Review - Thompson Square: Masterpiece

soundslikenashville.com

Album Review

Thompson Square will release Masterpiece on June 1. Their first album in five years, Masterpiece also marks the couple’s first independent release since departing with their former label, Stoney Creek Records. Shawna and Keifer Thompson had a hand in writing nine of the album’s 11 tracks, as well as served as producers alongside Nathan Chapman (Taylor Swift), Dann Huff (Keith Urban) and Ilya Toshinskiy.

Masterpiece marks a triumphant return for the country duo. The album begins with the stand-out title track which Keifer penned by himself for his son, Cooper. While Keifer is featured on lead vocals, his wife, Shawna, assists on harmony throughout the song. “da Vinci’s got his Mona Lisa / And Beethoven’s got his symphonies / But you’re my masterpiece,” Thompson Square sing on the song’s chorus alongside soaring musical accompaniment. A heartfelt ballad for their first child, “Masterpiece” strikes a chord.

“Up In Smoke” follows suit with ear-grabbing guitar, delicate piano and Shawna and Keifer’s spot-on harmonies. The tale of two exes who can’t seem to forget about each other, “Up In Smoke” highlights the duo’s rock side. In fact, throughout Masterpiece, Thompson Square’s diverse musical influences are showcased. The duo blend country, rock and even reggae for a versatile and memorable release. On “Good Day” the duo transport listeners to the islands with a laid-back vibe that would make Bob Marley proud. Meanwhile, on the tongue-in-cheek “Stupid Girls Stupid Boys,” Thompson Square poke fun at their significant other’s exes.

“Shout out to the stupid girls, baby / Screw must have come loose kind of crazies / I don’t mean to be mean / But I don’t think they knew what they were losing / Every time I’m lookin’ at you I can’t believe / There was somebody who had you and gave you back,” Thompson Square sing on the chorus of “Stupid Girls Stupid Boys.”

Thompson Square are well known for their love songs and the “Are You Gonna Kiss Me Or Not” singers don’t stray from the romance on Masterpiece. Songs like the catchy “Millionaires” and the sultry “Let’s Do Something Stupid” keep the romance alive while highlighting each singer’s vocal power. Later, on “A Love Like This,” Thompson Square merge rock instrumentation with country storytelling as they discuss how “a love like this only comes around every once in a lifetime.”

Masterpiece closes with the poignant “Breakers.” A song that tugs on the heartstrings, on “Breakers” Thompson Square sing of how often it’s the people we love the most that hurt us the deepest. Shawna’s ethereal vocals supported by slowed piano accompaniment further heighten the song’s powerful lyrics. “You’re supposed to love me / Oh, but I can’t make you / And I’m getting tired of giving all I’ve got to a taker / Some people are fixers / But some people are breakers,” Shawna sings.

Thompson Square have said that they hope “Breakers” serves as a “massive exclamation mark at the end of the record.” A deeply personal and emotional song, it does just that. In fact, their entire album spans a multitude of emotions and genres that keeps the listener intrigued. A work of art in itself, Thompson Square’s third album Masterpiece proves a welcomed return from the duo.

back to top


Luke BryanAlbum Review - Luke Bryan: What Makes You Country

soundslikenashville.com

Album Review

There is no denying that Luke Bryan is a country boy. Throughout his sixth studio album, aptly titled What Makes You Country, the Georgia native sings about his country roots, among other topics. Co-produced by Jeff and Jody Stevens, What Makes You Country features 15 versatile tracks that vary from love and loss to the power of a song and dreaming big.

“I’ve gotten to follow all my dreams and still remain true to who I am as a person,” Bryan says. “I just try to go in the studio and record music that makes me happy, makes me feel something and makes me emotional at times. Songs that I visualize my crowd reacting to.”

While Bryan includes catchy party songs like “Drinking Again” and “Driving This Thing” on the album, he also digs deep on the poignant “Most People Are Good” and the standout “Land of A Million Songs,” making for a well-rounded release that tugs on the heartstrings. Bryan co-wrote seven of the album’s 15 tracks and whether he’s singing about the life he hopes his sons will have on “Pick It Up” or how to treat a girl on “Like You Say You Do,” Bryan reaffirms exactly why he’s one of the genre’s most sought after artists.

On the title track “What Makes You Country,” Bryan sings of the constant debate of what makes someone country. Is it their boots, the size of their fires or their “wild ass buddies?” As he reminisces of his own days on the farm covered in peanut dust, Bryan explains that country can be found in everything. “You can be a cowboy on the Texas plain / Or a plow boy waitin’ on the rain / We’re all a little different but we’re all the same / Everybody doin’ their own thing,” he sings. “Just be proud of what makes you country.”

Later, he shares his optimistic views on humanity within the lyrics of the powerful “Most People Are Good.” Penned by David Frasier, Ed Hill and Josh Kear, the song’s sweet sentiment has Bryan singing of how he believes kids should stay kids as long as they can and the importance of working hard for what you want in life.

“I believe most people are good / And most mamas oughta qualify for sainthood / I believe most Friday nights look better under neon or stadium lights / I believe you love who you love, ain’t nothin’ you should ever be ashamed of / I believe this world ain’t half as bad as it looks,” he sings on the chorus.

When he’s not offering philosophical views on life, Bryan amps up his sex appeal with songs like the sultry summer jam “Out of Nowhere Girl.” A tale of running into a girl at a bar on a Saturday night, Bryan muses of how she “fell right out of the sky and landed right here tonight” to dance with him. His rhythmic singing style combined with hand snapped beats and soaring guitar licks heat things up. Meanwhile, on “Hungover In a Hotel Room” added harmonies from Emily Weisband light a spark as Bryan croons of a fun night under the sheets that has him considering to extend his hotel stay.

The album’s standout moments include two songs Bryan had a hand in writing, “Land of A Million Songs” and “Pick It Up.” On “Land of A Million Songs” he sings of his move to Nashville in hopes to chase after the songs inside him.

“Everybody’s got a story that needs to be told / And they pray someday they’ll hang a little Gold / And ride back to their hometown with their head held high / On any given day there’s a dream, there’s a chance that lightning will strike at the end of a pen and all of the leaving and losing will all be worth the fight / So you’re always searching for a little something different to say,” he sings. Later, he observes, “Some will come and some will go / If you don’t lay it all out there you’ll never know.”

On “Pick It Up” Bryan is quite literally laying things out for his sons in hopes to guide them in life. Throughout the song, he sings of leaving a fishing rod, Bible, guitar and Ronnie Milsap record in his son’s room. While he doesn’t want to force them to pick these things up, he instead wishes that one day they might find some interest and smile when they think of him.

Six albums into his career, Bryan continues to surprise listeners. While the hip-shaking singer may be best known for his party anthems and dance moves in concert, What Makes You Country has the singer-songwriter diving deeper with songs that will no doubt survive the test of time.There is no denying that Luke Bryan is a country boy. Throughout his sixth studio album, aptly titled What Makes You Country, the Georgia native sings about his country roots, among other topics. Co-produced by Jeff and Jody Stevens, What Makes You Country features 15 versatile tracks that vary from love and loss to the power of a song and dreaming big.

“I’ve gotten to follow all my dreams and still remain true to who I am as a person,” Bryan says. “I just try to go in the studio and record music that makes me happy, makes me feel something and makes me emotional at times. Songs that I visualize my crowd reacting to.”

While Bryan includes catchy party songs like “Drinking Again” and “Driving This Thing” on the album, he also digs deep on the poignant “Most People Are Good” and the standout “Land of A Million Songs,” making for a well-rounded release that tugs on the heartstrings. Bryan co-wrote seven of the album’s 15 tracks and whether he’s singing about the life he hopes his sons will have on “Pick It Up” or how to treat a girl on “Like You Say You Do,” Bryan reaffirms exactly why he’s one of the genre’s most sought after artists.

On the title track “What Makes You Country,” Bryan sings of the constant debate of what makes someone country. Is it their boots, the size of their fires or their “wild ass buddies?” As he reminisces of his own days on the farm covered in peanut dust, Bryan explains that country can be found in everything. “You can be a cowboy on the Texas plain / Or a plow boy waitin’ on the rain / We’re all a little different but we’re all the same / Everybody doin’ their own thing,” he sings. “Just be proud of what makes you country.”

Later, he shares his optimistic views on humanity within the lyrics of the powerful “Most People Are Good.” Penned by David Frasier, Ed Hill and Josh Kear, the song’s sweet sentiment has Bryan singing of how he believes kids should stay kids as long as they can and the importance of working hard for what you want in life.

“I believe most people are good / And most mamas oughta qualify for sainthood / I believe most Friday nights look better under neon or stadium lights / I believe you love who you love, ain’t nothin’ you should ever be ashamed of / I believe this world ain’t half as bad as it looks,” he sings on the chorus.

When he’s not offering philosophical views on life, Bryan amps up his sex appeal with songs like the sultry summer jam “Out of Nowhere Girl.” A tale of running into a girl at a bar on a Saturday night, Bryan muses of how she “fell right out of the sky and landed right here tonight” to dance with him. His rhythmic singing style combined with hand snapped beats and soaring guitar licks heat things up. Meanwhile, on “Hungover In a Hotel Room” added harmonies from Emily Weisband light a spark as Bryan croons of a fun night under the sheets that has him considering to extend his hotel stay.

The album’s standout moments include two songs Bryan had a hand in writing, “Land of A Million Songs” and “Pick It Up.” On “Land of A Million Songs” he sings of his move to Nashville in hopes to chase after the songs inside him.

“Everybody’s got a story that needs to be told / And they pray someday they’ll hang a little Gold / And ride back to their hometown with their head held high / On any given day there’s a dream, there’s a chance that lightning will strike at the end of a pen and all of the leaving and losing will all be worth the fight / So you’re always searching for a little something different to say,” he sings. Later, he observes, “Some will come and some will go / If you don’t lay it all out there you’ll never know.”

On “Pick It Up” Bryan is quite literally laying things out for his sons in hopes to guide them in life. Throughout the song, he sings of leaving a fishing rod, Bible, guitar and Ronnie Milsap record in his son’s room. While he doesn’t want to force them to pick these things up, he instead wishes that one day they might find some interest and smile when they think of him.

Six albums into his career, Bryan continues to surprise listeners. While the hip-shaking singer may be best known for his party anthems and dance moves in concert, What Makes You Country has the singer-songwriter diving deeper with songs that will no doubt survive the test of time.

back to top


BradberyAlbum Review - Danielle Bradbery: I Don’t Believe We’ve Met

soundslikenashville.com

Album Review

In Danielle Bradbery’s coming-of-age sophomore album, I Don’t Believe We’ve Met, the 21-year-old vocalist sheds her image of a young The Voice contestant and reintroduces herself as a matured artist ready to share her developed sound with the world.

I Don’t Believe We’ve Met is Bradbery’s first album since her self-titled 2013 debut. Her life has changed drastically since then and her new music reflects that. Most notably, her dive into songwriting comes to life on this project, in which she wrote seven out of the ten tracks.

Throughout the tracklist the Texas-native opens herself to vulnerability. Alongside established Music Row writers, including Nicolle Galyon, Rhett Akins, Heather Morgan and Thomas Rhett, Bradbery forms a cohesive album that explores honest emotions and relationships.

“The making of this new album was a lot and exciting and every emotion you could possibly think of. I got into songwriting and that led to wanting to write about just real stuff and real feelings and situations I was in and I had been in,” she told Sounds Like Nashville during a recent interview.

Bradbery’s sound evolves in this project as well. No longer bounded by traditional country, she experiments with pop and R&B tones to create her own sound. Additionally, Bradbery shows great vocal control and strays away from belting. This results in emotional ballads and raw tracks that continue the theme of vulnerability.

“Potential” is a reflective song that discusses the realization of not being in love with someone, but what they have the potential to be. In a similar heart-wrenching fashion, “Human Diary” captures what it is like to lose a significant other and everything that goes along with it.

“Cause you were my human diary/So when you left you didn’t just leave/No,you took all my secrets with you/You took all my secrets with you/And now you’re with someone else/And thinking ‘bout it hurts like hell,” she croons throughout the chorus.

The struggles of relationships are also put on display in “What Are We Doing” and “Messy,” both of which deal with unfulfilling situations that are a call-to-action to fix the problems or move on.

Though much of the track list contains more mature topics, Bradbery knows how to throw in happy tunes. The breezy lead-single, “Sway,” throws caution to the wind with airy feel-good lyrics. “Hello Summer,” written by labelmate Rhett, is the perfect song to get fans through dreary winter days and will leave them dreaming of summer romance.

Bradbery stands up for herself in bluesy “Worth It,” a girl-power anthem preaching that despite what anyone might say, you’re worth it. “Can’t Stay Mad” is more contrary, when you realize that no matter what your significant other might do, it’s near impossible to stay mad. The easy-listening song is relatable and is one of the album’s standout tracks.

It is obvious Danielle Bradbery took her time with I Don’t Believe We’ve Met with thoughtful lyrics and intentional production. She has grown up immensely since her last album and seems to have started a new and bright chapter in her career.

back to top


Garth BrooksGarth Brooks Beautifully Illustrates Beginning of His Career in Part 1 of ‘The Anthology’

soundslikenashville.com

Album Review

Just like Santa Claus can be counted on to come to the home of all good little boys and girls in the month of December, November for country music fans since the 1990’s usually means something new from Garth Brooks. Whether it be a studio album, box set or Yuletide album (last year, it was all three), Brooks makes a release week special – like nobody before him or since. Well, it’s November, and Brooks has done it again with a five CD collection that showcases his career from 1989-1993. The country superstar offers more than a few unheard versions of some songs that fans have come to know, a beautifully-illustrated and detailed account of the how his career was built and the story behind the recording of each song in the first part of the anthology. It’s the first set in a multi-package plan to showcase Brooks and his music as never before. And, as usual, he hits the mark – right between the eyes.

Disc one takes us back to what we know as the beginnings of Brooks’ career ride, his 1989 self-titled debut album. “Not Counting You,” one of his first singles, and the traditional ballad, “I’ve Got A Good Thing Going,” are presented in the same form as you know them from that first album, as are several of the cuts that introduced Brooks to the country music world. But, what makes the disc – and the set – impressive is the “day write” / demo versions of many of the songs that became classics. “If Tomorrow Never Comes” is one of those songs from the first set, which vocally doesn’t sound much different. If anything, Brooks’ voice is perhaps a step rawer than on the hit version, which became his first number one hit in December of 1989. He also gives fans a taste of the makings of “Much Too Young (To Feel This Damn Old),” which broke him earlier that year. It’s an elementary statement to make, but hearing the demos makes one realize the genius of Allen Reynolds in the production chair – as well as the circle of musicians that made gave Brooks’ recordings a signature sound, especially the fiddle work of Rob Hajacos. Listeners will also get to hear what Brooks heard when he became enamored with Tony Arata’s “The Dance” – the writer’s stark version. It’s a bit of country music history that is well worth the listen.

Disc two takes us inside the making of No Fences, the 1990 album that set Brooks apart from the pack. The day-write of “The Thunder Rolls” sets the tempo for the disc, followed by the brilliantly-executed production of the studio version. The master versions of such Brooks stalwarts as “Victim Of The Game” are included, as well as Arata’s version of “Same Old Story.” Brooks also includes the day-write version of “Unanswered Prayers” as well as a demo of the stone-country “Which One Of Them,” a song that wasn’t heard by the masses until its’ inclusion on a 1998 box set, The Limited Series.

back to top


 

 

KFLG 947 Facebook
CP & Tyrone
KFLG Top 5 @ 5
KFLG The 90's at noon
KFLG Double Shot Sundays

| Home | KFLG DJ's | Flag Facts | Music Reviews | KFLG Fun | Contact Us |
Employment Opportunities | Contest Rules | Public EEO Reports

KFLG947.com © 2018 Cameron Broadcasting, Inc.